Cosmetic Dentistry:

Getting better smiles, makes ones life with full of self confidence. So, to be more successful in private or business life, many people gets benefits of cosmetic dentistry services.

From the smallest to the biggest procedure we have the right dentist to handle your case. 

Dentistry

Cosmetic Dentistry

Teeth whitening is one of the most popular cosmetic dentistry treatments offering a quick, non-invasive and affordable way to enhance a smile.  Universally valued by men and women alike, whitening (or bleaching) treatments are available to satisfy every budget, time frame and temperament. Whether in the form of professionally administered one-hour whitening sessions at a dental office or cosmetic spa, or home-use bleaching kits purchased at your local drugstore, solutions abound.

Virtually everyone who opts for a teeth whitening solution sees moderate to substantial improvement in the brightness and whiteness of their smile. That said, it’s not a permanent solution to discoloration and requires maintenance or “touch-ups” for a prolonged effect.

In this article we break down everything related to teeth whitening, including the process of tooth discoloration, what causes staining, the various treatment options available, and their associated risks and costs.

Bleaching vs. Whitening: What’s the Difference?

According to the FDA, the term “bleaching” is permitted to be used only when the teeth can be whitened beyond their natural color. This applies strictly to products that contain bleach — typically hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide.

The term “whitening” on the other hand, refers to restoring a tooth’s surface color by removing dirt and debris. So technically speaking, any product that is used to clean the teeth (like a toothpaste) is considered a whitener. Of course, the term whitening sounds better than bleaching, so it is more frequently used — even when describing products that contain bleach.

The bleach preference for in-office whitening, where time is limited, is powerful and fast-acting hydrogen peroxide. When used in bleaching teeth, hydrogen peroxide concentrations range from approximately nine percent to 40 percent.

By contrast, the bleach of preference for at-home teeth whitening is slower-acting carbamide peroxide, which breaks down into hydrogen peroxide. Carbamide peroxide has about a third of the strength of hydrogen peroxide. This means that a 15 percent solution of carbamide peroxide is the rough equivalent of a five percent solution of hydrogen peroxide.

For those for whom teeth whitening is not an option — be it due to stubborn intrinsic tooth staining or some other functional concern — porcelain veneers may be the answer. A porcelain shell is fabricated to fit over a prepared tooth to correct worn enamel, uneven alignment/spacing, chips/cracks, and/or discoloration.

If you’re unhappy with your teeth and are looking to manufacture the perfect smile, porcelain veneers offer an excellent solution. However, keep in mind that unlike whitening, veneer application is an invasive procedure that requires the permanent alteration of your natural teeth.

Invisible braces are designed for adults and older teenagers but are not recommended when baby teeth remain. Children and younger teenagers faced with orthodontic problems will require traditional metal braces with brackets/wires on the front of the teeth.

However, only your dentist or orthodontist can determine if you are a candidate. The alternative treatment was designed primarily for adults due to the need for absolute and rigid cooperation; the “trays” are worn 22 hours per day and should not be forgotten or lost.

Types

Popular types of invisible braces include ceramic brackets, inside braces and clear aligners. Ceramic braces are just like metal braces, except that they use tooth-colored brackets (and sometimes tooth-colored wires) rather than metal to straighten teeth. Generally non-staining, the tooth-colored ceramic “blends” with your teeth, making them less noticeable than metal, but not as “invisible” as inside braces or clear aligners. Inside braces — also called inside invisible braces, lingual braces or “iBraces” — and clear aligners go one step further, making treatment virtually invisible. Each alternative has its advantages and disadvantages.

“Ceramic, or “clear,” braces are made of composite materials that are weaker and more brittle than their metal counterpart. Ceramic brackets are larger than metal brackets and require small rubber bands, or ligatures, (or built in spring clips on “self ligating” brackets) to hold them to the arch wire. Because the ligatures are white or clear, they can stain. However, staining is not a big problem because ligatures are changed every time you get an adjustment (generally monthly). The “self ligatiing” clips do not require retying with wires or elastics.

Also like metal braces, ceramic brackets are not removable until treatment is completed, can produce irritation and discomfort, and may complicate regular tooth care, eating and speaking.

Because they are not as strong as metal braces, clear braces require a longer treatment time, since your orthodontist may need to apply a slower, more gradual force to ensure the strength capabilities of the clear brackets are not overtaxed. Ceramic brackets also are usually more expensive than traditional metal brackets (about $500 more). As a cost-saving measure, some patients may opt to have ceramic braces placed only on the most visible teeth — typically the upper teeth or just the upper center teeth — while using traditional metal brackets on the remaining teeth that need straightening. Also, there is some possibility of tooth abrasion if the incisal edges of the upper front teeth touch the lower ceramic brackets.

Inside braces (including such brands as 3M’s Incognito Orthodontic Braces) are attached to the back of the teeth so they are hidden from view. Current iBraces use scanned images of the insides of the teeth to create special, computer-designed custom brackets that are attached to the insides of the upper and sometimes lower teeth. This makes them appealing to people who are often in public and might feel self-conscious about wearing clear aligners or braces with metal or ceramic brackets/wires on the front of their teeth. Whereas clear, removable aligners can be misplaced or lost, thereby delaying treatment, iBraces are fixed and not removable. Elastics can be used with iBraces to help hasten treatment.

Such elastics are available for use with clear aligners but are more difficult to use.

If you think you have a gummy smile, visit your dentist for confirmation and treatment options. Your dentist will examine your mouth, teeth and gums to determine the extent of the excessive gingival display and any possible causes.

This examination may involve conventional and/or digital impressions of your teeth and gums. You may also need X-ray imaging so that the tooth roots and jaw bone can be carefully examined.

Your dentist may refer you to a specialist, like a periodontist, orthodontist or an oral surgeon.

Depending on the nature of your specific clinical condition, treatment could include one or more of the following:

  • Same-day laser treatments (in minor cases).

  • Surgical lip repositioning.

  • Orthodontics (braces) to move the teeth into more suitable positions.

  • Surgical Sculpting of the gingival tissues and bone to create healthier and more attractive looking gum contours.

  • Maxillofacial surgery to reposition the bone.

     

    This Surgical Sculpting procedure can be performed on one or more teeth to create an even gum line or a more natural looking smile.

    For example, according to the American Academy of Periodontology, a periodontist – a dentist specializing in the gums, soft tissues and other structures supporting the teeth – can perform a “crown lengthening” procedure to correct the appearance of a gummy smile. During this procedure, the periodontist will remove the excess gum tissue – and possibly bone – in order to expose more of the tooth’s surface.
    As a result, gummy smile sufferers see more of their teeth when they smile and less of their gums.

A dental crown (also referred to as a cap) is a fixed prosthetic object that is cemented onto a tooth. Only a dentist can remove it once it’s in place. The main purpose of a crown is to cover a damaged tooth, but it also strengthens it, improving its overall appearance and alignment in the mouth.

Crowns are made by taking an impression of the tooth or teeth they’ll be covering. Before this impression is created, your dentist must first reduce your tooth’s size so that the crown fits properly. Your dentist may also place a temporary crown while the permanent one is being made.

Types of Dental Crowns

There are four different types of dental crowns.

  • Ceramic — These are used for restoring front teeth, and are popular in this area for their ability to blend with your natural tooth color. The crown is made of a porcelain-based material.

  • Porcelain-fused to metal – This crown provides a stronger bond than regular porcelain because it is connected to a metal structure. It’s also extremely durable.

  • Gold alloys – This crown is a mix of gold, copper and other metals. In addition to providing a strong bond to the tooth, it doesn’t fracture, nor does it wear away the tooth itself.

  • Base metal alloys – This crown is made up of non-noble metals that are highly resistant to corrosion, and make for a very strong crown. It also requires the least amount of healthy tooth to be removed prior to fitting.

Dental implants are artificial tooth roots used to support a restoration for a missing tooth or teeth, helping to stop or prevent jaw bone loss. The implantation procedure is categorized as a form of prosthetic (artificial replacement) dentistry, but also is considered a form of cosmetic dentistry.

People who have lost teeth might feel too self-conscious to smile or talk.

Additionally, biting irregularities caused by tooth loss can have a negative effect on eating habits, leading to secondary health problems like malnutrition.

By replacing missing tooth roots, dental implants provide people with the strength and stability required to eat all the foods they love, without struggling to chew. Additionally, they help to stimulate and maintain jaw bone, preventing bone loss and helping to support facial features.

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